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Meow

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( This is a porn blog for cats. )

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08/08/2012 19:33:30

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07/07/2012 01:06:59

rbk-creationary:

Simeis 188 in stars, dust and gas.
NASA

rbk-creationary:

Simeis 188 in stars, dust and gas.

NASA

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07/05/2012 20:28:37

oceanofemptiness:

NGC253

oceanofemptiness:

NGC253

(Source: flickr.com)

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05/31/2012 04:12:19

the-star-stuff:

Looking Back at an Eclipsed Earth 
The shadow of the Moon on Earth during the Solar eclipse of August 11, 1999. This picture was taken from the Russian Mir space station. Credit: Mir 27 Crew; Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES); NASA (APOD)

the-star-stuff:

Looking Back at an Eclipsed Earth 

The shadow of the Moon on Earth during the Solar eclipse of August 11, 1999. This picture was taken from the Russian Mir space station. 

Credit: Mir 27 Crew; Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES); NASA (APOD)

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05/28/2012 12:14:43

presja:

Hell yea.

presja:

Hell yea.

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04/03/2012 07:22:15

the-star-stuff:

Scientific Evidence that Geomagnetic Storms Are Making You Sick

Geomagnetic storms aren’t just beautiful to look at — these disturbances in the Earth’s magnetic field could also be messing with your mind and body. There’s a ton of evidence suggesting that geomagnetic storms can cause everything from depression to cardiac problems — and may even be influencing the stock market.

A new paper suggests there’s a lot more evidence for this connection than anybody realizes. 

The paper, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, argues that there’s a large, disparate, and controversial body of scientific literature that links geomagnetic storms to a number of animal behaviors, including cardiovascular, psychiatric and behavioral changes in humans. And author Dr. James Close has the enormous literature review to back up his claims.

[continue reading…]

Images via NASA/Goddard

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03/31/2012 18:00:05

the-star-stuff:

The mighty, mighty Dragonfish
The Dragonfish nebula — named for its resemblance to a terrifyingly toothy deep-sea fish — is, like its namesake, a monster. It’s something like 450 light years across… compare that to the Orion Nebula’s 12-15 light year width and you start to see how huge this thing is. It’s also incredibly massive: it may have a total mass exceeding 100,000 times the Sun’s mass, and may contain millions of stars!
Incredible. Even from other galaxies, it must be one of the most obvious features in the Milky Way. Yet, ironically, it’s very difficult to see at all from Earth. It’s located over 30,000 light years away, on the other side of the galaxy. There’s a vast amount of interstellar material (like dust) between us and it, absorbing its light, so in optical light it’s essentially invisible. But infrared light can pierce that fog, and the image above was taken using NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to look in the infrared.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Toronto

the-star-stuff:

The mighty, mighty Dragonfish

The Dragonfish nebula — named for its resemblance to a terrifyingly toothy deep-sea fish — is, like its namesake, a monster. It’s something like 450 light years across… compare that to the Orion Nebula’s 12-15 light year width and you start to see how huge this thing is. It’s also incredibly massive: it may have a total mass exceeding 100,000 times the Sun’s mass, and may contain millions of stars!

Incredible. Even from other galaxies, it must be one of the most obvious features in the Milky Way. Yet, ironically, it’s very difficult to see at all from Earth. It’s located over 30,000 light years away, on the other side of the galaxy. There’s a vast amount of interstellar material (like dust) between us and it, absorbing its light, so in optical light it’s essentially invisible. But infrared light can pierce that fog, and the image above was taken using NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to look in the infrared.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Toronto

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